Elementary

Out of Wonder, by Kwame Alexander, Chris Colderley, and Marjory Wentworth

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Out of Wonder

The instant New York Times bestseller!

A Newbery Medalist and a Caldecott Honoree offer a glorious, lyrical ode to poets who have sparked a sense of wonder.

Out of gratitude for the poet’s art form, Newbery Award-winning author and poet Kwame Alexander, along with Chris Colderley and Marjory Wentworth, present original poems that pay homage to twenty famed poets who have made the authors’ hearts sing and their minds wonder. Stunning mixed-media images by Ekua Holmes, winner of a Caldecott Honor and a John Steptoe New Talent Illustrator Award, complete the celebration and invite the reader to listen, wonder, and perhaps even pick up a pen.

Stef Soto, Taco Queen, by Jennifer Torres

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Stef Soto, Taco QueenA heartwarming and charming debut novel about family, friends, and finding your voice all wrapped up in a warm tortilla.

Estefania “Stef” Soto is itching to shake off the onion-and-cilantro embrace of Tia Perla, her family’s taco truck. She wants nothing more than for Papi to get a normal job and for Tia Perla to be a distant memory. Then maybe everyone at school will stop seeing her as the Taco Queen.
But when her family’s livelihood is threatened, and it looks like her wish will finally come true, Stef surprises everyone (including herself) by becoming the truck’s unlikely champion. In this fun and heartfelt novel, Stef will discover what matters most and ultimately embrace an identity that even includes old Tia Perla.

A Boy Called Bat, by Elana Arnold

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A Boy Called Bat

From acclaimed author Elana K. Arnold and with illustrations by Charles Santoso, A Boy Called Bat is the first book in a funny, heartfelt, and irresistible young middle grade series starring an unforgettable young boy on the autism spectrum.

For Bixby Alexander Tam (nicknamed Bat), life tends to be full of surprises–some of them good, some not so good. Today, though, is a good-surprise day. Bat’s mom, a veterinarian, has brought home a baby skunk, which she needs to take care of until she can hand him over to a wild-animal shelter.

But the minute Bat meets the kit, he knows they belong together. And he’s got one month to show his mom that a baby skunk might just make a pretty terrific pet.

Lucky Broken Girl, by Ruth Behar

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Lucky Broken Girl“A book for anyone mending from childhood wounds.”–Sandra Cisneros, author of The House on Mango Street

In this unforgettable multicultural coming-of-age narrative–based on the author’s childhood in the 1960s–a young Cuban-Jewish immigrant girl is adjusting to her new life in New York City when her American dream is suddenly derailed. Ruthie’s plight will intrigue readers, and her powerful story of strength and resilience, full of color, light, and poignancy, will stay with them for a long time.

Ruthie Mizrahi and her family recently emigrated from Castro’s Cuba to New York City. Just when she’s finally beginning to gain confidence in her mastery of English–and enjoying her reign as her neighborhood’s hopscotch queen–a horrific car accident leaves her in a body cast and confined her to her bed for a long recovery. As Ruthie’s world shrinks because of her inability to move, her powers of observation and her heart grow larger and she comes to understand how fragile life is, how vulnerable we all are as human beings, and how friends, neighbors, and the power of the arts can sweeten even the worst of times.

When Andy Met Sandy, by Tomie dePaola

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When Andy Met Sandy_web.jpgALSC Notable Book 2017. In this first Andy and Sandy book, geared toward emerging independent readers, Andy arrives at the playground thinking, “Today I have the place to myself!” Meanwhile, someone new appears—Sandy, who’s thinking, “I’ve never been to this playground before.” Initially, they each play separately but, gradually, they both realize that certain activities, like kicking the ball and swinging, might be more fun together. It’s when they spy the seesaw, however, that those thoughts become spoken words, and after enjoying their seesaw ride, they announce simultaneously, “We are friends!” Spare, uncomplicated text makes this easy to read for little ones starting out on their own, and dePaola’s ever-appealing multimedia illustrations subtly reinforce the concept through Andy’s and Sandy’s varying perspectives. The scenario and supportive, insightful approach will likely resonate with many kids, especially shyer ones, highlighting how reaching out can bring rewards like fun and friendship.

School’s First Day of School by Adam Rex, illustrated by Christian Robinson

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schools first day of school_web.jpgALSC Notable Book 2017. First-day jitters are a frequent picture-book topic, but this one has a surprising twist: the nervous one is the school building. Frederick Douglass Elementary is a brand-new school, and so far, he only knows the janitor. The first day is coming, however, and School is worried that the kids won’t like him. First, he overhears some older kids say they hate school; then a freckled girl doesn’t even want to come inside. “I must be awful,” School thinks to himself. But soon, the day picks up. He hears a funny joke at lunchtime, he learns about shapes, and the freckled girl paints a lovely picture of him that the teacher pins to the wall (it hurts a little, but School doesn’t mind). Robinson’s blocky, naive-style paintings set just the right tone, and the subtle faces on all the buildings hint that School’s not the only building with feelings. Meanwhile, Rex doesn’t play the gag only for laughs; rather, he seamlessly weaves School’s dialogue into the tale, as if he’s just another student in the classroom. With bold illustrations featuring a diverse array of children and text that’s ideal for reading aloud, this charming reversal of first-day-of-school nerves will delight little ones and help put their own anxieties at bay.

A Hungry Lion; or, A Dwindling Assortment of Animals by Lucy Ruth Cummins

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a hungry lion_web.jpgALSC Notable Book 2017. Animals disappear one by one, except for a hungry lion. Perhaps the lion is to blame, but could there be another explanation for these rapidly disappearing critters? Cummins’ enjoyably repetitive text and droll illustrations give each animal a personality, despite their pending departure, from the stand-out sauciness of the lion to the affable nature of the ever-present turtle. The stark backgrounds play this up and allow each character to stand out. They reappear at a surprise party, but the tables turn–again (and again)–until ultimately one unexpected survivor remains. All the carnage (both real and assumed) takes place off-page, potentially furthering confusion caused by the story’s many twists. Illustrations in brush marker, gouache, graphite, colored pencil, and charcoal playfully contrast with the macabre undertones.