Friendship

Mango Delight, by Fracaswell Hyman

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MangoDelight
A realistic story about recovering from social disaster, being true to your family, and finding your inner diva.

Mango Delight Fuller has survived many challenges: her food-based name, the birth of her baby brother, and her parents’ refusal to get her a cell phone until she turns thirteen. But when she beats her best friend Brooklyn in track practice, Brooklyn dumps Mango and joins the Cell Belles, a gossipy clique of bullies who taunt Mango into getting herself suspended from the track team and then trick her into trying out for the school musical. Surprise- she gets the lead, and her strict mom won’t let her back out, even though Mango has never sung in front of an audience before. Worse, Brooklyn’s dad owns the restaurant where Mango’s dad is a chef, and might fire him because of their daughters’ fight. Mango must find a way to make up for her mistake and make a new place for herself at the school. Read-alikes: Ruby Reinvented; Fly, Blackbird; Stef Soto, Taco Queen. Published 2017. –E.S

Ahimsa, by Supriya Kelkar

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Ahimsa

Gripping historical fiction about a Brahmin girl whose mother joins the fight for India’s independence.

When Anjali and her best friend, Irfaan, get caught painting a Q (for Quit India) on the British colonial headquarters in their town, Anjali’s mother loses her job as the secretary of the British commander. Anjali’s life is upended as her parents join Mahatma Gandhi in the struggle for freedom from British rule, working for the release of political prisoners and organizing against colonial economic exploitation by boycotting British goods and refusing to provide labor or raw materials. As the British stoke divisons in her community, Anjali finds herself struggling to keep a good relationship between her Hindu family and Irfaan’s Muslim family, as well as with her own beliefs about the Dalits, a caste of Hindus who are either pitied or despised by the other castes. Based on the life of the author’s great -grandmother, this fast-paced novel offers historical insights into the lives of Indians who joined Gandhi and Dr. B.R. Ambedkar to help free India from colonial rule, religious division, and social prejudice, as well as a thoughtful exploration of relative privilege and the importance of listening to the people you think need your help. Great for fans of Chains and The War That Saved My Life. Published 2017.  –E.S.

Stef Soto, Taco Queen, by Jennifer Torres

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Stef Soto, Taco QueenA heartwarming and charming debut novel about family, friends, and finding your voice all wrapped up in a warm tortilla.

Estefania “Stef” Soto is itching to shake off the onion-and-cilantro embrace of Tia Perla, her family’s taco truck. She wants nothing more than for Papi to get a normal job and for Tia Perla to be a distant memory. Then maybe everyone at school will stop seeing her as the Taco Queen.
But when her family’s livelihood is threatened, and it looks like her wish will finally come true, Stef surprises everyone (including herself) by becoming the truck’s unlikely champion. In this fun and heartfelt novel, Stef will discover what matters most and ultimately embrace an identity that even includes old Tia Perla.

Riding Chance, by Christine Kendall

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Riding Chance

This is a story of family, brotherhood, and a hero’s journey amid city streets and an uncertain future.

Troy is a kid with a passion. And dreams. And wanting to do the right thing. But after taking a wrong turn, he’s forced to endure something that’s worse than any juvenile detention he can imagine-he’s “sentenced” to the local city stables where he’s made to take care of horses. The greatest punishment has been trying to make sense of things since his mom died but, through his work with the horses, he discovers a sport totally unknown to him-polo.

Troy has to figure out which friends have his back, which kids to cut loose, and whether he and Alisha have a true connection. Laced with humor and beating with heartache, this novel will grip readers, pull them in quickly, and take them on an unforgettable ride.

Set in present day Christine Kendall’s stunning debut lets us come face-to-face with the challenges of a loving family that turn hardships into triumphs.

When Andy Met Sandy, by Tomie dePaola

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When Andy Met Sandy_web.jpgALSC Notable Book 2017. In this first Andy and Sandy book, geared toward emerging independent readers, Andy arrives at the playground thinking, “Today I have the place to myself!” Meanwhile, someone new appears—Sandy, who’s thinking, “I’ve never been to this playground before.” Initially, they each play separately but, gradually, they both realize that certain activities, like kicking the ball and swinging, might be more fun together. It’s when they spy the seesaw, however, that those thoughts become spoken words, and after enjoying their seesaw ride, they announce simultaneously, “We are friends!” Spare, uncomplicated text makes this easy to read for little ones starting out on their own, and dePaola’s ever-appealing multimedia illustrations subtly reinforce the concept through Andy’s and Sandy’s varying perspectives. The scenario and supportive, insightful approach will likely resonate with many kids, especially shyer ones, highlighting how reaching out can bring rewards like fun and friendship.

Horrible Bear! by Ame Dyckman illustrated by Zachariah Ohora

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horrible bear_web.jpgALSC Notable Book 2017. Hoping to retrieve her kite, a girl reaches into sleeping Bear’s cave just as he rolls over, inadvertently crushing it beneath him. “Horrible Bear!” she shrieks and then stomps home to scribble, kick, and (accidentally) rip the ear off her stuffed bunny. Meanwhile, Bear is indignant over being so rudely awakened, and he is bent on revenge. He practices barging and making a ruckus, eventually stomping down the mountain to the girl’s house. When the two meet, however, the girl (who now realizes accidents just happen) immediately apologizes, draining all the horrible out of Bear. He becomes Sweet Bear, dedicated to patching up toys and friendships. The creators of Wolfie the Bunny (2015) explore the common childhood experiences of accidents and misunderstandings with sensitivity and humor. A perfectly over-the-top look at tantrums, friendship, and forgiveness that is sure to resonate with preschoolers and parents alike.

Because You’ll Never Know Me by Leah Thomas

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because you'll never meet me_webOllie and Moritz are best friends, but they can never meet. Ollie has a life-threatening allergy to electricity, and Moritz’s weak heart requires a pacemaker. If they ever did meet, they could both die. Living as recluses from society, the boys develop a fierce bond through letters that become a lifeline during dark times–as Ollie loses his only friend, Liz, to the normalcy of high school and Moritz deals with a bully set on destroying him. But when Moritz reveals the key to their shared, sinister past that began years ago in a mysterious German laboratory, their friendship faces a test neither one of them expected.