Short Stories

Guys Read: Terrifying Tales

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terrifying tales_web.jpgBe afraid, be very afraid of Terrifying Tales, the sixth volume in the Guys Read Library of Great Reading.

Eleven masters of suspense—Kelly Barnhill, Michael Buckley, Adam Gidwitz, Adele Griffin and Lisa Brown, Claire Legrand, Nikki Loftin, Daniel Jose Older, Dav Pilkey, R.L. Stine, and Rita Williams-Garcia—have come together to bring you a bone-chilling collection of original ghost stories with illustrations by Gris Grimly, perfect for sharing around the campfire, reading under the covers with a flashlight, and scaring your friends’ pants off.

Compiled and edited by kid-lit madman Jon Scieszka, Guys Read: Terrifying Tales is a creepy-fun read (if you’re brave enough, that is).

Anna Hibiscus by Atinuke

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anna hibiscus_web.jpgWith this introductory phrase, “Anna Hibiscus lives in Africa. Amazing Africa,” we are introduced to the many facets of an African child’s daily life with her close-knit family. The culture, land, and people of Africa come shining through in Atinuke’s absolutely delightful stories.

A Tale Dark & Grimm by Adam Gidwitz

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a tale dark and grimm_web.jpgIn this mischievous and utterly original debut, Hansel and Gretel walk out of their own story and into eight other classic Grimm-inspired tales. As readers follow the siblings through a forest brimming with menacing foes, they learn the true story behind (and beyond) the bread crumbs, edible houses, and outwitted witches.

Fairy tales have never been more irreverent or subversive as Hansel and Gretel learn to take charge of their destinies and become the clever architects of their own happily ever after.

Zelda and Ivy by Laura McGee Kvansosky

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zelda and ivy_web.jpgZelda and Ivy are fox sisters with a flair for the dramatic.Their exploits unfold with plenty of sugar and sass in this spirited trio of stories. Wry and genuine, the linked episodes and expressive illustrations will strike home with beginning readers, especially those who’ve experienced the warmth — and occasional wrath — of a sibling’s attentions.

Toys Go Out: Being the Adventures of a Knowledgeable Stingray, a Toughy Little Buffalo, and Someone Called Plastic written and illustrated by Emily Jenkins

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toys go out_webIn the backpack, where it is very dark — The serious problem of Plastic-ness — The terrifying bigness of the washing machine — The possible shark — How Lumphy got on the big high bed and lost something rather good-looking — It is difficult to find the right birthday present. Six stories relate the adventures of three best friends, who happen to be toys.